Unlocking the Mystery of Homeschooling High School

The moment has arrived! Your teen is finally in high school! Yikes! Where has time gone? Wasn’t it just yesterday that you were teaching him to write his name? Now it’s time to teach high school and you’re not quite sure what to do. It’s time to take those dreaded SATs, make transcripts, and prepare your teen for graduation. Can you do it? Of course, you can! Relax! Here’s some help from two experienced homeschooling moms. You can have a peaceful, joy-filled, successful high school adventure! You can plan courses ahead and take advantage of spontaneous opportunities using the principles in this book. You can send your children debt-free– Unlocking the Mystery of Homeschooling High School will share how several young people did it! You can make your own transcripts with the step-by-step instructions in this book. Best of all, you can enjoy the high school journey at home! Ready to homeschool high school yet? You can do this! Between the two of us, we have graduated seven teenagers. One has her master’s degree and taught freshman English at UCF. Another works at Verizon after graduating with a degree in accounting and systems management. One works at AAA putting his marketing degree to work. Another works at Charisma magazine as a copy editor. Some attended Stetson University, a private college nearby and some attended UCF on scholarship. They defended their faith, proclaimed Christ, and made excellent grades. They stayed plugged into their local and enjoyed healthy relationships with their families. Has it been a smooth, easy road? No, not always. But, we have persevered through every obstacle and everyone in both families agree: Homeschooling High School was the BEST Choice! If you want to homeschool with confidence, then read this book and keep your eyes on Jesus. We can show you the practical stuff and He gives you His Word and Spirit to guide you day by day in the glorious adventure of homeschooling high school. Here are the chapters: High School ClassCreditsPlan to EducateCreating ClassesTranscriptsSample TranscriptsMaking TranscriptsSAT PrepCourse DescriptionCollege Application Process Going to College Debt-FreeGraduation

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Real Homeschool

This book is not really about social media per se, but more about our hearts in a world that continues to push us to be more like it. Everywhere we turn, social media is screaming at us and showing us pictures of what we should be. Slowly, gradually, we start following the world and trying to bring God with us, rather than letting God lead us and then bringing the world with us! There are the desires that creep in and take my focus off of my true purpose in homeschooling. You know what I mean- when the focus becomes all about finding the best curriculum or filling up the schedule with the most extracurricular activities? Or how about decorating the perfect homeschool room? Or the hours spent online searching what others are doing, while neglecting your own time with the Lord? These are all things that have become an issue with me, and I am sure with others, especially as social media grows. I have often thought about those early homeschoolers who had no Internet or fancy curriculum but truly sought the Lord in their decision to homeschool. I admire them so much! They weren’t busy showing off their schoolrooms or their kids on Instagram; they were deep in the nitty-gritty of daily homeschool life when homeschooling wasn’t even mainstream. They weren’t spending hours on Pinterest, but probably hours in the Word. This book will challenge us to get back to the basics and fully rely on God. We need to stop living up to an Internet ideal and live only for God’s ideals. Pinterest and Instagram and all the other media out there are certainly not bad in and of themselves, but we do need to be aware of our hearts when using them. We must not let those things rule our standards. Only God should rule us. Will you join me as we get back to the basics? Will you join me as we endeavor to be real with each other because we need each other? Will you join me as we focus on what God wants for our homeschools and not what the world says is success? Will you join me as we pursue Real Homeschool? Not a picture-perfect homeschool, but a real homeschool -where the rubber meets the road and it sometimes gets messy -and we work together through those messes… And then it gets beautiful…oh, so beautiful…because God is right there with us. He is working through our families on this real homeschooling journey. God has called us to this beautiful journey…and the perfect picture is the one where He is leading every step, guiding us, and our eyes are fixed solely on Him.”

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Books to Build On

A companion volume to the highly successful series of textbooks for grades one through six, Books to Build On lists books and other print resources–organized by topic–related to the material covered in the textbooks, designed to encourage further study.

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Story of Little Black Sambo

A remarkable celebration from the Caldecott Honor-winning artist! A clever young boy outwits a band of voracious tigers and returns home in triumph to a splendid feast of a yard-high stack of pancakes. The story, penned by Helen Brodie Bannerman for her two daughters in 1889, has captured the imagination of readers around the world and across many generations. But the pictures which accompanied her text were crudely stereotypical and hurtful to many. Caldecott Honor-winning artist Christopher Bing has spent almost fifteen years rediscovering the joy and energy of the original story. He respects that Bannerman was writing in an Indian setting and with Indian animals-after all, there are no tigers in Africa-and faithfully adheres to the original text. However, recognizing that the image of Sambo has been used as a symbol of repression of Africans and African-Americans, Christopher Bing celebrates Sambo as proudly African, a child of beauty and joy, wit and resourcefulness. In recreating the illusion of an antique, weathered, tiger-clawed storybook filled with exquisitely detailed paintings that draw upon a lush jungle-inspired palette, Christopher Bings interpretation of Sambos world seamlessly melds a grand sense of wonder with the minutiae of nature, and a story with history.

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The Hate U Give

8 starred reviews ∙ Goodreads Choice Awards Best of the Best ∙ William C. Morris Award Winner ∙ National Book Award Longlist ∙ Printz Honor Book ∙ Coretta Scott King Honor Book ∙ #1 New York Times Bestseller! “Absolutely riveting!” —Jason Reynolds “Stunning.” —John Green “This story is necessary. This story is important.” —Kirkus (starred review) “Heartbreakingly topical.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) “A marvel of verisimilitude.” —Booklist (starred review) “A powerful, in-your-face novel.” —Horn Book (starred review) Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life. And don’t miss On the Come Up, Angie Thomas’s powerful follow-up to The Hate U Give.

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The Private Roots of Public Action

Why, after several generations of suffrage and a revival of the women’s movement in the late 1960s, do women continue to be less politically active than men? Why are they less likely to seek public office or join political organizations? The Private Roots of Public Action is the most comprehensive study of this puzzle of unequal participation. The authors develop new methods to trace gender differences in political activity to the nonpolitical institutions of everyday life–the family, school, workplace, nonpolitical voluntary association, and church. Different experiences with these institutions produce differences in the resources, skills, and political orientations that facilitate participation–with a cumulative advantage for men. In addition, part of the solution to the puzzle of unequal participation lies in politics itself: where women hold visible public office, women citizens are more politically interested and active. The model that explains gender differences in participation is sufficiently general to apply to participatory disparities among other groups–among the young, the middle-aged, and the elderly or among Latinos, African-Americans and Anglo-Whites. Table of Contents: Acknowledgments 1. Introduction: Citizenship and Unequal Participation 2. Studying Gender and Participation: A Brief Discourse on Method 3. Civic Activity: Political and Non-Political 4. The Political Worlds of Men and Women 5. The Legacy of Home and School 6. Domestic Tranquility: The Beliefs of Wives and Husbands 7. Domestic Hierarchy: The Household as a Social System 8. The Workplace Roots of Political Activity 9. The Realm of Voluntarism: Non-Political Associations and Religious Institutions 10. Gender, Institutions, and Political Participation 11. Gender, Race or Ethnicity, and Participation 12. Family Life and Political Life 13. What If Politics Weren’t a Man’s Game? 14. Conclusion: The Private Roots of Public Action Appendixes A. Numbers of Cases B. Ranges of Variables C. Supplementary Tables D. Explanation of Outcomes Analysis Index Reviews of this book: The Private Roots of Public Action begins with common explanations for the gender difference in participation, from domestic demands on women’s time and psychic space through the effects of the patriarchal family, socioeconomic hierarchies, and political socialization…The results of [this] novel analysis are complex and interesting…The authors extend their model to examine the relationship between class, race or ethnicity, and political participation. This unique and accessible volume will be influential in the fields of political socialization and gender and politics. Strongly recommended. –B. E. Marston, Choice The Private Roots of Public Action is the most comprehensive examination of the similarities and differences in the political activity of women and men. The range of inquiry is enormous. Burns, Schlozman and Verba delve not only into political activity but also into the processes in the family, in the workplace, in places of worship, and in voluntary associations that promote and inhibit political involvement. This book goes beyond the literature in connecting to an enormous range of scholarship in political science, economics, and sociology. This is a fine piece of work. –John Mark Hansen, University of Chicago The Private Roots of Public Action is a very important book. It pushes research on gender and participation to a whole new level, and reshapes the agenda as far as our thinking and our research about the connections among family life, the workplace, institutions of civil society, and political and governmental institutions. The authors demonstrate the importance of understanding political participation within a larger context in a way that does justice to the complexity of people’s lives. –Kristi Anderson, Syracuse University The Private Roots of Public Action is an important contribution to the literature on both political participation and gender politics. Because of its database, its tie-in to the most current work on political participation, and its comprehension of important current questions about gender politics, this book provides a new benchmark for work in this field. In particular, the Civic Voluntarism model developed by Verba, Schlozman, and Brady, and the consideration of how gender difference and inequality might feed into that model, is a unique contribution. This accessible book will be welcomed by gender politics scholars and will have an impact on the field of political participation. –Virginia Sapiro, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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A Beginner's Guide to Constructing the Universe

The Universe May Be a Mystery, But It’s No Secret Michael Schneider leads us on a spectacular, lavishly illustrated journey along the numbers one through ten to explore the mathematical principles made visible in flowers, shells, crystals, plants, and the human body, expressed in the symbolic language of folk sayings and fairy tales, myth and religion, art and architecture. This is a new view of mathematics, not the one we learned at school but a comprehensive guide to the patterns that recur through the universe and underlie human affairs. A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing, the Universe shows you: Why cans, pizza, and manhole covers are round. Why one and two weren’t considered numbers by the ancient Greeks. Why squares show up so often in goddess art and board games. What property makes the spiral the most widespread shape in nature, from embryos and hair curls to hurricanes and galaxies. How the human body shares the design of a bean plant and the solar system. How a snowflake is like Stonehenge, and a beehive like a calendar. How our ten fingers hold the secrets of both a lobster and a cathedral. And much more.

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